Graduate Course Descriptions

Below are two lists.  First, a list of upcoming graduate courses with full descriptions and other specific information.  Below that is a list of all graduate-level courses offered by the Department.  A full listing of graduate level courses is also available at the OSU Course Catalog.  For a complete listing of courses offered in recent, current, and upcoming semesters, see the OSU Master Schedule.

Upcoming Graduate Courses

 

Spring Semester 2019


5010S Teaching Philosophy
Instructor: J. Jorati
UH 353, WF 9:35-10:55

Isn’t it a shame that most people don't encounter philosophy until they get to college? In this course, we will do something about that: we'll develop a set of philosophy lessons and then team-teach some of these lessons to students at the Columbus Alternative High School (CAHS). Our lesson plans will incorporate a variety of different instructional methods in order to make these lessons as engaging and effective as possible. To lay the foundations for the development of the lessons, the course covers various teaching methods and strategies for lesson planning.

Note: 5010-S doesn’t count toward the 5000-level course requirements for the major.

Note also: some of the teaching will occur from 7.30–9.30am on Wednesdays. Contact me if that’s a problem: jorati.1@osu.edu

5210 Ancient Philosophy-Aristotle
Instructor: A. Silverman
UH 353; TR 11:10-12:30

Aristotle, one of, if not the most influential philosopher of all time, wrote on virtually every subject from Poetics, to Birth of Animals to Metaphysics. We shall try to cover a handful of his most famous writings and topics:

CATEGORIES, SUBJECT AND PREDICATE; Reading is Categories
WHAT'S CHANGEAND HOW IS IT POSSIBLE? Reading is Physics
WHAT IS SOUL AND WHAT ARE ITS POWERS, ESPECIALLY IN HUMANS-Reading is De Anima
WHAT IS SUBSTANCE AND IS THE STUDY OF WHAT THERE IS SPECIAL? Reading is Metaphysics
VIRTUE, HAPPINESS, DELIBERATION AND THE BEST LIFE-Reading is Nicomachean Ethics

Class Requirements: participation and one paper approximately 10-15 pages.

5450 Advanced Aesthetic Theory
Instructor: R. Kraut
UH353; TR 2:20-3:340

The goal is to explore a number of issues that concern the interpretation and evaluation of artworks and artistic performances. Our concern is with artworld objects and practices: familiarity with aspects of the visual arts, music, dance, sculpture, literature, photography, and/or other artistic domains is essential. Topics to be explored include the ontology of art; testimony and aesthetic knowledge; artworld norms; interpretation of artistic objects; and the status of aesthetic properties. For a detailed description click here.

5500 Advance Symbolic Logic
Instructor: S. Shapiro
UH 353; MW11:10-12:30

An introduction to the meta-theory of first-order languages.  The proof theory and model-theoretic semantics for a standard formal language will be developed.  The course will include proofs of the completeness, compactness, and Löwenheim-Skolem theorems.  The purpose of the course is to provide an introduction to mathematical logic, and to provide some of the logical background presupposed by many contemporary philosophical authors.  Occasionally, issues in the philosophy of logic will be raised.  There will be a midterm exam, a final exam, and several quizzes over homework exercises.  Prerequisite:  Philosophy 2500 or equivalent.

8200 Seminar in History of Philosophy
Instructor: L. Dowing
UH 353, W 3:55-6:40

Mechanism and Newtonianism       

Strict mechanism of the early modern variety can be characterized as the view that (1) the nature of bodies is exhausted by a short list of (primary) qualities including size, shape, solidity or impenetrability, and motion/rest and (2) the behavior of bodies ought to be explained in terms of the motions and impacts of submicroscopic particles possessing only such qualities.  It is thus a view that straddles metaphysics, physics, and philosophy of science.  Newton’s theory of gravity as articulated in his Principia Mathematica seemed to many at the time to pose a severe challenge to strict mechanism by challenging its fundamental principles or background assumptions.  In this version of this seminar, we will examine Robert Boyle as a representative and influential mechanist, then turn to the challenge of Newton, then examine the debate over the implications of Newtonianism, focusing here on George Berkeley and Emilie du Châtelet.

8300 Seminar in Value Theory
Instructor: P. Turner
UH 353, T 3:55-6:40

What role should ideals and idealization play in political philosophy? Does feasibility affect justice? Can we rationally approach ideal justice? Is consensus on justice a good thing? This course will explore the vigorous debate that has taken shape concerning ideal and non-ideal political theory. We will focus in particular on the questions of utopian vs. realistic theory and end‐state vs. transitional theory. Authors will include: David Estlund, Gerald Gaus, Charles Mills, Ingrid Robeyns, Amartya Sen, A. John Simmons, Laura Valentini, and more.

8750 Seminar in Theory of Knowledge
Instructor: A. Roth
UH 353, R 3:55-6:40

The seminar will look at some papers on the moral psychology of trust and the epistemological literature on testimony.  The aim is to develop a properly epistemic notion of trust.  This will require looking at some recent work on the nature of obligations that are in some sense owed or directed to others. 

Suppose that you are familiar with a speaker’s extensive track record of true utterances.  On some occasion, you hear the speaker say something and, on the basis of the track record, you believe them.  Do you trust them?  It might seem not.  For one, the fact that you base your belief on the evidence provided by the track record seems to suggest that at least in some sense you don’t really trust them.  But if that’s right, is it ever reasonable to trust someone?  And even if it were reasonable, would it be rational in an epistemic (as opposed to practical) sense? 

Some authors hold that trust is conceptually linked to the possibility of being let down by the individual in whom trust is vested.  If I trust you on some matter and you don’t follow through, then you let me down; you wrong me in some sense.  This points to another worry about the track record idea; if I trust the speaker on the basis of his track record, and he doesn’t come through, maybe it’s my fault for not picking up on subtle aspects of that record.  Perhaps I was too hasty to believe on this occasion.  He didn’t let me down; I let myself down.  And that suggests that I didn’t trust him in the first place, but instead trusted my own powers of observation and induction. 

Suppose that it is essential to trusting another that it involves the possibility of being let down, of being wronged by them.  What does this sort of wronging involve?  This is an issue raised in the moral literature associated with directed duties, such as that of promissory obligation.  But it’s not clear that this has any direct epistemic significance.  Might this be a further reason to think that trust should not figure in epistemology?  Or might there be a distinctively epistemic notion of letting down or wronging?  We will try to get a clearer understanding of the nature of directed duty with the aim of making sense of the epistemic significance of trust. 

Readings

Testimony: Hume, Reid, Coady, Fricker, Lackey, Burge, Owens, Goldberg, Malmgren, Faulkner, Neta, Christensen & Kornblith

Trust: Moran, Hieronymi, Holton, Jones, Baier, Hinchman

Relational normativity/directed duty:  Strawson, Wallace, Thompson, Darwall, Marusic & White

8900 Placement Seminar
Instructor: T. McPherson
UH 353, M 12:40-3:25

8999 Dissertation Seminar
Instructor: J. Jorati
UH 353, W 12:40-3:25
 

Complete Listing of Philosophy Graduate Courses

5211  (601.01)--Ancient Philosophy: Plato
3 Credit Hours

A survey of central philosophical themes in one or more Platonic dialogues.
Prereq: 301 or 10 cr hrs of Philos at the 200 level; or above; or grad standing in Philos; or permission of instructor.

5212  (601.02)--Ancient Philosophy:  Aristotle
3 Credit Hours

A survey of central philosophical themes in one or more Aristotelian treatises.
Prereq: 301 or 10 cr hrs of Philos at the 200 level; or above; or grad standing in Philos; or permission of instructor.

5210  (601.03)--Ancient Philosophy:  Studies in Ancient Philosophy
3 Credit Hours

Variable content; special topics in ancient Greek philosophy, including value theory, logic, metaphysics and natural science in pre-Socratics, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle the Hellenistic schools or neo-Platonism.
Prereq: 301 or 10 cr hrs of Philos at the 200 level; or above; or grad standing in Philos; or permission of instructor. Repeatable to a maximum of 10 cr hrs.

5220  (602)--Studies in Medieval Philosophy
3 Credit Hours

An intensive examination of a major philosopher, school or philosophical problem of the medieval period; topics vary.
Prereq: 302 and 10 cr hrs of Philos course work at the 200 level or above; or grad standing in Philos; or permission of instructor. Repeatable to a maximum of 15 cr hrs.

5230  (603)--Studies in 17th-Century Philosophy
3 Credit Hours

An intensive examination of a major philosopher or philosophical problem of the rationalist period; topics vary from quarter to quarter.
Prereq: 303 and 10 cr hrs of Philos course work at the 200 level or above; or grad standing in Philos; or written of instructor. Repeatable to a maximum of 15 cr hrs.

5241  (604.01)--Studies in 18th Century Philosophy:  Kant
3 Credit Hours

An intensive examination of one or more important themes in Kant's philosophical writings.
Prereq: 303, or 304, and 10 cr hrs of Philos course work at the 200 level or above; or grad standing in Philos; or permission of instructor.

5240  (604.02)--Studies in 18th Century Philosophy:  Selected Problems or Topics
3 Credit Hours

An intensive examination of one or more important themes in Kant's philosophical writings.
Prereq: 303, or 304, and 10 cr hrs of Philos course work at the 200 level or above; or grad standing in Philos; or permission of instructor.

5260  (606)--Studies in 20th-Century Philosophy
3 Credit Hours

An intensive examination of one or more central movement in 20th-century philosophy; topics vary.
Prereq: 15 cr hrs of Philos course work at the 200 level or above, or grad standing in Philos or permission of instructor. Repeatable to a maximum of 15 cr hrs.

5830  (612)--Introduction to Cognitive Science
3 Credit Hours

Cognitive science is an interdisciplinary study of the nature of human thought; psychological, philosophical, linguistic, and artificial intelligence approaches to knowledge representation.
Prereq: Permission of instructor or a total of 12 cr hrs from at least two of the following areas: Cptr Inf, Linguist, Philos, and Psych. Not open to students with credit for CptrInf 612, Linguist 612, or Psych 612 or 794 (Sp Qtr 1989) or 794A (Wi Qtr 1990). Cross-listed in Computer and Information Science, Linguistics, and Psychology.

5840  (620)--Advanced Philosophy of Cognitive Science
3 Credit Hours

In-depth examination of the influence of results in cognitive science upon the way in which philosophers approach fundamental issues about the nature of the mind.
Prereq: 467 or permission of instructor.

5420  (625)--Philosophical Topics in Feminist Theory
3 Credit Hours

An analytical study of selected philosophical issues arising out of feminist theory, such as the nature of autonomy, or the relation between gender and knowledge.
Prereq: 10 cr hrs of Philos course work at the 300 level or above; or grad standing; or permission of instructor. Repeatable to a maximum of 10 cr hrs.

5400  (630)--Advanced Political and Social Philosophy
3 Credit Hours

An intensive examination of issues in political and social philosophy, including democracy, civil disobedience, anarchism, totalitarianism, nature of the state, etc.
Prereq: 230 and 10 cr hrs of Philos course work at the 200 level or above; or grad standing in Philos; or permission of instructor, and English 110 or 111 or equiv.

5300   (631)--Advanced Moral Philosophy
3 Credit Hours

An intensive examination of major issues within moral philosophy such as: the foundations of morality; objectivity in ethics; morality, reason and sentiment; virtues and vices.
Prereq: 431 and 10 cr hrs of Philos course work at the 200 level or above or grad standing in Philos or permission of instructor.

5410  (638)--Advanced Philosophy of Law
3 Credit Hours

An examination of the nature and function of law and of such problems as the relation of law to morality and the justification of punishment.
Prereq: 338 and 10 cr hrs of Philos coursework at the 200 level or above; or grad standing; or equiv or permission of instructor.

5450  (640)--Advanced Aesthetic Theory
3 Credit Hours

Basic issues in philosophy of art: the definition of art; meaning, truth, and representation in art; the nature and basis of criticism; the criteria of interpretation of works of art.
Prereq: 15 cr hrs of Philos course work at 200 level or above; grad standing in Philos; or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 641.

5500  (650)--Advanced Symbolic Logic
3 Credit Hours

Introduction to the metatheory of first-order logics and languages: axiomatic development of propositional and predicate logic; model theory; soundness, completeness, and Lowenheim-Skolem theorems.
Prereq: 250

5510  (652)--Nonclassical Logic
3 Credit Hours

Study of selected systems of nonclassical logic, such as entailment systems, modal, many-valued, epistemic, deontic, imperative, erotetic, tense, and free logics.
Prereq: 650. Repeatable to a maximum of 10 cr hrs.

5650  (655)--Advanced Philosophy of Science
3 Credit Hours

A study of the nature and structure of scientific concepts, laws, and theories; appraisal of methodologies, presuppositions, and frames of reference in science.
Prereq: 250 and 10 cr hrs of Philos course work at the 300 level or above (preferably 455); or 250 and grad standing in Philos; or permission of instructor.

5750  (660)--Advanced Theory of Knowledge
3 Credit Hours

An intensive examination of major epistemological problems: the possibility, origin, foundation, structure, methods, limits, types, and validity of knowledge.
Prereq: 250 and 10 cr hrs of Philos course work at the 300 level or above (preferably 460); or grad standing; or permission of instructor.

5700  (663)--Advanced Metaphysics
3 Credit Hours

An intensive examination of major metaphysical problems: categories, universals, substance and process, causality and law, space and time, metaphysical presuppositions of knowledge.
Prereq: 250 or 10 cr hrs of Philos course work at the 300 level or above (preferably 463); or grad standing; or permission of instructor.

5800  (667) - Advanced Philosophy of Mind
3 Credit Hours

Classical and contemporary approaches to the nature of mind, mind-body, other minds, intentionality, and other problems.
Prereq: 15 cr hrs of Philos course work at the 300 level or above (preferably 467); or grad standing in Philos; or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 767.

5850  (670) - Philosophy of Religion
3 Credit Hours

A study of religious concepts and problems; the idea and nature of God, of humans, their relation to the world and human destiny.
Prereq: 10 cr hrs of Philos course work at the 300 level or above; or grad standing; or permission of instructor.

5600  (673) - Advanced Philosophy of Language
3 Credit Hours

Basic problems and results in the philosophy of language, concentrating on theories of reference, theories of meaning, and theories of language-use (speech-acts, implicature, etc.).
Prereq: 250 and 10 credit hrs of Philos course work at the 300 level or above (preferably 473); or grad standing in Philos; or permission of instructor.

8100  (700) - First-Year Seminar
4 Credit Hours

A topically variable introduction to advanced philosophical methodology.
Open only to first-year philosophy grad students.

5550  (750)--Advanced Logical Theory
3 Credit Hours

Topics include formal arithmetic, recursive functions, Turing machines, Godel's incompleteness theorems, Church's thesis, arithmetical truth, logical paradoxes, and higher-order logic.
Preq: 250 and 650.  Repeatable to a maximum of 15 hours.

8200  (801)--Seminar in the History of Philosphy
1-4 Credit Hours
Preq: Grad standing in Philos or permission of instructor.  Repeatable to a maximum of 30 cr hrs.

8300  (830)--Seminar in Value Theory
1-4 Credit Hours
Preq: Grad standing in Philos or permission of instructor.  Repeatable to a maximum of 30 cr hrs.

8500  (850)--Seminar in Logic
1-4 Credit Hours
Preq: Grad standing in Philos or permission of instructor.  Repeatable to a maximum of 30 cr hrs.

8600  (873)--Seminar in Philosophy of Language
1-4 Credit Hours
Preq: Grad standing in Philos or permission of instructor.  Repeatable to a maximum of 30 cr hrs.

8650  (855)--Seminar in Philosophy of Science
1-4 Credit Hours
Preq: Grad standing in Philos or permission of instructor.  Repeatable to a maximum of 30 cr hrs.

8750  (860)--Seminar in Theory of Knowledge
1-4 Credit Hours
Preq: Grad standing in Philos or permission of instructor.  Repeatable to a maximum of 30 cr hrs.

8700  (863)--Seminar in Metaphysics
1-4 Credit Hours
Preq: Grad standing in Philos or permission of instructor.  Repeatable to a maximum of 30 cr hrs.

 

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