Graduate Course Descriptions

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Below are two lists.  First, a list of upcoming graduate courses (Autumn 2020 and Spring 2021) with full descriptions and other specific information.  Below that is a list of all graduate-level courses offered by the Department.  A full listing of graduate level courses is also available at the OSU Course Catalog.  For a complete listing of courses offered in recent, current, and upcoming semesters, see the OSU Master Schedule.

Upcoming Graduate Courses


Autumn 2021

5212 – Ancient Philosophy: Aristotle
Instructor: A. Silverman
WF 9:35-10:55, UH 353

We will focus on the Metaphysics, Epistemology and Ethics of Aristotle, to include readings on:

CATEGORIES--WHO NEEDS CATEGORIES? NOT JUST THE SYLLOGISM BUT THE WHOLE ORGANON!
CHANGE--WHAT'S CHANGE? NOT JUST THE PHYSICS BUT GENERATION AND CORRUPTION!
SOUL AND ENERGEIA--@#%$^!?--BOTH THE DE ANIMA AND THE METAPHYSICS.
AND AT LONG LAST, BESIDES ARISTOTLE ON HAPPINESS AND VIRTUE, 
A CHANCE TO SEE WHETHER ANY SENSE CAN BE MADE OF WEAKNESS OF WILL IN THE NICOMACHEAN ETHICS.
If you sign up for this exclusive offer, there will be no payment due for 3 months. After completion of the training participants will turn in a 10 to 15 page paper.

5750 – Advanced Theory of Knowledge
Instructor: A. Roth
WF 11:10-12:30, UH 353

The class starts by getting some epistemological concepts and concerns on the table with a look at several papers on the nature of the warrant or justification for perceptual belief.  The main focus of the course, however, is the epistemological literature on testimony and the moral psychology of trust.  The aim is to develop a properly epistemic notion of trust.  This will require looking also at some recent work on the nature of obligations that are in some sense owed or directed to others.  For exciting details you won’t want to miss, go to:  http://u.osu.edu/roth.263/courses/.

5840 – Advanced Philosophy of Cognitive Science
Instructor: R. Samuels
TR 3:55-5:15, 353 UH

Cognitive science is an exciting interdisciplinary field of enquiry that has, over the past few decades, exerted a profound influence on longstanding philosophical debates about the nature of the mind. In this course we focus on some of these debates. In particular: Is consciousness amenable to scientific explanation? How is possible for us to represent world in thought? Is the human mind a computer of some sort? Although a background in cognitive science is not assumed, we will read papers by prominent psychologists and neuroscientists, as well as philosophers.

8100 – First Year Seminar
Instructor: C. Pincock & A. Roth
W 3:55-6:40, 353 UH

8300 – Seminar in Value Theory
Instructor: T. McPherson
T 12:40-3:25, UH 353 

Once our new first-year cohort is selected in April, I will solicit grad student interest in a very wide range of seminar topics that I could teach, and offer the seminar that appears to be of most interest to potential participants. Stay tuned!

8700 – Seminar in Metaphysics
Instructor: R. Kraut
F 12:40 - 3:25 PM, UH 353

VARIETIES OF PRAGMATISM
"Pragmatism’ is said in many ways.  Within philosophy the term designates themes associated with Dewey and Peirce, visible in Heidegger and the later Wittgenstein, and moving through Sellars, Quine, Davidson, Rorty, Brandom and others.  Such themes include the following:

1. rejection of the Enlightenment tradition built upon the pursuit of Objective Truth;
2. the proper role of intuitions in philosophical theorizing: the extent to which they are merely “spontaneous judgments” or “traces of language games we’ve learned to play”;
3. the explanatory role (if any) of semantic notions;
4. deflationist theories of truth and reference; rejection of truth-as-correspondence-to-reality; minimalism about semantic discourse; the relation between truth and warranted assertibility;
5. the significance (and plausibility) of justificatory holism;
6. skepticism about the bifurcation of language into expressive and descriptive components;
7. the idea that conceptual content is best understood in terms of human practices and activities;
8. the philosophical value of a non-circular “…genealogy or anthropology…about how [a given] mode of talking and thinking might come about, given in terms of the functions it serves.”;
9. (derivative from 8). anti-representationalism: a shift from concern with the representational properties of a discourse to concern with the role(s) played by the discourse within the larger sphere of human goals and practices; more generally, skepticism about the explanatory value of the notions of representation and reference;
10.  rejection of the idea that normativities sustained within social practice depend upon metaphysical facts; more generally, skepticism about the legitimacy of invoking ontology as a ground of normativity;
11. rejection (and occasional derision/ridicule) of metaphysics;
12.  suggestion that the notion of objectivity is defective, and should be replaced with the notion of social solidarity.

The goal of this seminar is to explore these themes, noting interconnections and assessing various pragmatist claims.  Readings by Rorty, Quine, Misak, Brandom, Michael Williams, Davidson, Steven Levine, Huw Price, Blackburn, Amie Thomasson, David Macarthur, and others.  Requirements: two 10-15 page papers, weekly discussion postings.

8800 - Seminar in Philosophy of Mind
Instructor: D. Smithies
M 12:40 - 3:25 PM, UH 353

In this seminar, we’ll explore a series of connected questions in philosophy of mind and epistemology. (1) What is it to believe a proposition? (2) What is it to understand a concept? (3) What is it to make an inference? (4) What justifies making an inference? And (5) what is the source of a priori knowledge?

8900 - Placement Seminar
Instructor: T. McPherson
*Flexibility arranged by instructor

This course helps to prepare graduate students in the penultimate or final year of their studies to seek employment, especially academic employment in philosophy departments. Participants are informed about employment options and resources. They prepare, workshop, and revise the central elements of the dossiers they will need in order to seek academic employment. Participants are given guidance on the timing and character of the academic job market in philosophy, soliciting letters of recommendation, how to empower recommenders to write strong letters, and how to develop and manage their professional profile. They give research presentations to the Philosophy department’s colloquium series, and engage in practice interviews designed to prepare them for typical interviews on the academic job market.

Spring Semester 2022

5010S - Teaching Philosophy
Instructor: T. McPherson

5261 - Phenomenology and Existentialism
Instructor: T. Rudavsky

5500 - Advanced Symbolic Logic
Instructor: N. Tennant

7080 - Ethics in the Professions
Instructor: E. Lin

8001 - Graduate Teaching Seminar
Instructor: D. Smithies

8200 - Seminar in the History of Philosophy
Instructor: L. Downing

8500 - Seminar in Logic
Instructor: S. Shapiro

8999 Dissertation Seminar
Instructor: L. Shabel

Research for dissertation purposes only.

 


 

Complete Listing of Philosophy Graduate Courses

5010S  Teaching Philosophy
3 Credit Hours

Design a set of philosophy lessons and team-teach some of these lessons to secondary school students.

5210  (601.03)--Ancient Philosophy:  Studies in Ancient Philosophy
3 Credit Hours

Variable content; special topics in ancient Greek philosophy, including value theory, logic, metaphysics and natural science in pre-Socratics, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle the Hellenistic schools or neo-Platonism.
Prereq: 301 or 10 cr hrs of Philos at the 200 level; or above; or grad standing in Philos; or permission of instructor. Repeatable to a maximum of 10 cr hrs.


5211  (601.01)--Ancient Philosophy: Plato
3 Credit Hours

A survey of central philosophical themes in one or more Platonic dialogues.
Prereq: 301 or 10 cr hrs of Philos at the 200 level; or above; or grad standing in Philos; or permission of instructor.

5212  (601.02)--Ancient Philosophy:  Aristotle
3 Credit Hours

A survey of central philosophical themes in one or more Aristotelian treatises.
Prereq: 301 or 10 cr hrs of Philos at the 200 level; or above; or grad standing in Philos; or permission of instructor.

5220  (602)--Studies in Medieval Philosophy
3 Credit Hours

An intensive examination of a major philosopher, school or philosophical problem of the medieval period; topics vary.
Prereq: 302 and 10 cr hrs of Philos course work at the 200 level or above; or grad standing in Philos; or permission of instructor. Repeatable to a maximum of 15 cr hrs.

5230  (603)--Studies in 17th-Century Philosophy
3 Credit Hours

An intensive examination of a major philosopher or philosophical problem of the rationalist period; topics vary from quarter to quarter.
Prereq: 303 and 10 cr hrs of Philos course work at the 200 level or above; or grad standing in Philos; or written of instructor. Repeatable to a maximum of 15 cr hrs.

5240  (604.02)--Studies in 18th Century Philosophy:  Selected Problems or Topics
3 Credit Hours

An intensive examination of one or more important themes in Kant's philosophical writings.
Prereq: 303, or 304, and 10 cr hrs of Philos course work at the 200 level or above; or grad standing in Philos; or permission of instructor

5241  (604.01)--Studies in 18th Century Philosophy:  Kant
3 Credit Hours

An intensive examination of one or more important themes in Kant's philosophical writings.
Prereq: 303, or 304, and 10 cr hrs of Philos course work at the 200 level or above; or grad standing in Philos; or permission of instructor.

5260  (606)--Studies in 20th-Century Philosophy
3 Credit Hours

An intensive examination of one or more central movement in 20th-century philosophy; topics vary.
Prereq: 15 cr hrs of Philos course work at the 200 level or above, or grad standing in Philos or permission of instructor. Repeatable to a maximum of 15 cr hrs.

5261 Phenomenology and Existentialism
3 Credit Hours

Early existentialist ideas of Kierkegaard and Nietzsche; Husserl's phenomenological method and critical analysis of works of philosophers such as Heidegger, Jaspers, Sartre, Beauvoir, and others.

5300   (631)--Advanced Moral Philosophy
3 Credit Hours

An intensive examination of major issues within moral philosophy such as: the foundations of morality; objectivity in ethics; morality, reason and sentiment; virtues and vices.
Prereq: 431 and 10 cr hrs of Philos course work at the 200 level or above or grad standing in Philos or permission of instructor.

5400  (630)--Advanced Political and Social Philosophy
3 Credit Hours

An intensive examination of issues in political and social philosophy, including democracy, civil disobedience, anarchism, totalitarianism, nature of the state, etc.
Prereq: 230 and 10 cr hrs of Philos course work at the 200 level or above; or grad standing in Philos; or permission of instructor, and English 110 or 111 or equiv.

5410  (638)--Advanced Philosophy of Law
3 Credit Hours

An examination of the nature and function of law and of such problems as the relation of law to morality and the justification of punishment.
Prereq: 338 and 10 cr hrs of Philos coursework at the 200 level or above; or grad standing; or equiv or permission of instructor.

5420  (625)--Philosophical Topics in Feminist Theory
3 Credit Hours

An analytical study of selected philosophical issues arising out of feminist theory, such as the nature of autonomy, or the relation between gender and knowledge.
Prereq: 10 cr hrs of Philos course work at the 300 level or above; or grad standing; or permission of instructor. Repeatable to a maximum of 10 cr hrs.


5450  (640)--Advanced Aesthetic Theory
3 Credit Hours

Basic issues in philosophy of art: the definition of art; meaning, truth, and representation in art; the nature and basis of criticism; the criteria of interpretation of works of art.
Prereq: 15 cr hrs of Philos course work at 200 level or above; grad standing in Philos; or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 641.

5500  (650)--Advanced Symbolic Logic
3 Credit Hours

Introduction to the metatheory of first-order logics and languages: axiomatic development of propositional and predicate logic; model theory; soundness, completeness, and Lowenheim-Skolem theorems.
Prereq: 250

5510  (652)--Nonclassical Logic
3 Credit Hours

Study of selected systems of nonclassical logic, such as entailment systems, modal, many-valued, epistemic, deontic, imperative, erotetic, tense, and free logics.
Prereq: 650. Repeatable to a maximum of 10 cr hrs.

5550  (750)--Advanced Logical Theory
3 Credit Hours

Topics include formal arithmetic, recursive functions, Turing machines, Godel's incompleteness theorems, Church's thesis, arithmetical truth, logical paradoxes, and higher-order logic.
Preq: 250 and 650.  Repeatable to a maximum of 15 hours.

5600  (673) - Advanced Philosophy of Language
3 Credit Hours

Basic problems and results in the philosophy of language, concentrating on theories of reference, theories of meaning, and theories of language-use (speech-acts, implicature, etc.).
Prereq: 250 and 10 credit hrs of Philos course work at the 300 level or above (preferably 473); or grad standing in Philos; or permission of instructor.

5650  (655)--Advanced Philosophy of Science
3 Credit Hours

A study of the nature and structure of scientific concepts, laws, and theories; appraisal of methodologies, presuppositions, and frames of reference in science.
Prereq: 250 and 10 cr hrs of Philos course work at the 300 level or above (preferably 455); or 250 and grad standing in Philos; or permission of instructor.

5700  (663)--Advanced Metaphysics
3 Credit Hours

An intensive examination of major metaphysical problems: categories, universals, substance and process, causality and law, space and time, metaphysical presuppositions of knowledge.
Prereq: 250 or 10 cr hrs of Philos course work at the 300 level or above (preferably 463); or grad standing; or permission of instructor.


5750  (660)--Advanced Theory of Knowledge
3 Credit Hours

An intensive examination of major epistemological problems: the possibility, origin, foundation, structure, methods, limits, types, and validity of knowledge.
Prereq: 250 and 10 cr hrs of Philos course work at the 300 level or above (preferably 460); or grad standing; or permission of instructor.

5800  (667) - Advanced Philosophy of Mind
3 Credit Hours

Classical and contemporary approaches to the nature of mind, mind-body, other minds, intentionality, and other problems.
Prereq: 15 cr hrs of Philos course work at the 300 level or above (preferably 467); or grad standing in Philos; or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 767.

5830  (612)--Introduction to Cognitive Science
3 Credit Hours

Cognitive science is an interdisciplinary study of the nature of human thought; psychological, philosophical, linguistic, and artificial intelligence approaches to knowledge representation.
Prereq: Permission of instructor or a total of 12 cr hrs from at least two of the following areas: Cptr Inf, Linguist, Philos, and Psych. Not open to students with credit for CptrInf 612, Linguist 612, or Psych 612 or 794 (Sp Qtr 1989) or 794A (Wi Qtr 1990). Cross-listed in Computer and Information Science, Linguistics, and Psychology.

5840  (620)--Advanced Philosophy of Cognitive Science
3 Credit Hours

In-depth examination of the influence of results in cognitive science upon the way in which philosophers approach fundamental issues about the nature of the mind.
Prereq: 467 or permission of instructor.

5850  (670) - Philosophy of Religion
3 Credit Hours

A study of religious concepts and problems; the idea and nature of God, of humans, their relation to the world and human destiny.
Prereq: 10 cr hrs of Philos course work at the 300 level or above; or grad standing; or permission of instructor.

8001 --Graduate Training Seminar
1-3 Credit Hours
This course is designed to provide professional training for all first- and second-year graduate students that will enable them to develop the skills required for success in research, teaching and service.
Prereq: Grad standing in Philos. Repeatable to a maximum of 5 cr hrs or 2 completions. This course is graded S/U.

8100  (700) - First-Year Seminar
4 Credit Hours

A topically variable introduction to advanced philosophical methodology.
Open only to first-year philosophy grad students.

8200  (801)--Seminar in the History of Philosophy
1-4 Credit Hours
Preq: Grad standing in Philos or permission of instructor.  Repeatable to a maximum of 30 cr hrs.

8300  (830)--Seminar in Value Theory
1-4 Credit Hours
Preq: Grad standing in Philos or permission of instructor.  Repeatable to a maximum of 30 cr hrs.

8500  (850)--Seminar in Logic
1-4 Credit Hours
Preq: Grad standing in Philos or permission of instructor.  Repeatable to a maximum of 30 cr hrs.

8600  (873)--Seminar in Philosophy of Language
1-4 Credit Hours
Preq: Grad standing in Philos or permission of instructor.  Repeatable to a maximum of 30 cr hrs.

8650  (855)--Seminar in Philosophy of Science
1-4 Credit Hours
Preq: Grad standing in Philos or permission of instructor.  Repeatable to a maximum of 30 cr hrs.

8700  (863)--Seminar in Metaphysics
1-4 Credit Hours
Preq: Grad standing in Philos or permission of instructor.  Repeatable to a maximum of 30 cr hrs.

8750  (860)--Seminar in Theory of Knowledge
1-4 Credit Hours
Preq: Grad standing in Philos or permission of instructor.  Repeatable to a maximum of 30 cr hrs.


8800--Seminar in Philosophy of Mind
1-4 Credit Hours
Preq: Grad standing in Philos or permission of instructor.  Repeatable to a maximum of 30 cr hrs.

8900--Placement Seminar
1-3 Credit Hours

Prereq: Grad standing in Philos. Repeatable to a maximum of 9 cr hrs or 3 completions. This course is graded S/U.

8999 --Dissertation Research in Philosophy
1-9 Credit Hours
Research for dissertation purposes only.
Prereq: Repeatable to a maximum of 30 cr hrs or 30 completions. This course is graded S/U.

 

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